Nike and Atlas 1

A Pilaster depicting Victory from Roman Ascalon, by Kiernan Acquisto

This marble pilaster is the best preserved of four from the late second-early third century CE basilica at Ascalon. The sculpture depicts a winged Victory standing barefoot on a globe supported by a kneeling Atlas. The victory’s right leg is

Nike and Atlas 1

A Pilaster depicting Victory from Roman Ascalon, by Kiernan Acquisto

This marble pilaster is the best preserved of four from the late second-early third century CE basilica at Ascalon. The sculpture depicts a winged Victory standing barefoot on a globe supported by a kneeling Atlas. The victory’s right leg is

view 2

Megiddo in the Iron II period, by Danny Sarkis

These images derive from the site of Megiddo, a large administrative city in Israel’s Jezreel Valley, dating to the ninth and eighth centuries BCE. They help us understand what it meant to be an Israelite at this time. The building

view 2

Megiddo in the Iron II period, by Danny Sarkis

These images derive from the site of Megiddo, a large administrative city in Israel’s Jezreel Valley, dating to the ninth and eighth centuries BCE. They help us understand what it meant to be an Israelite at this time. The building

Hasmonean 2

Coin of Alexander Jannaeus, by Christine Mikeska

This coin was minted in the name of Alexander Jannaeus, the king of Judea from 103-76 BCE. One side is imprinted with an anchor encircled by the words “of King Alexander” in Greek script, while the other displays an eight

Hasmonean 2

Coin of Alexander Jannaeus, by Christine Mikeska

This coin was minted in the name of Alexander Jannaeus, the king of Judea from 103-76 BCE. One side is imprinted with an anchor encircled by the words “of King Alexander” in Greek script, while the other displays an eight

1850 etching

The Bunker Hill Battle Monument, by Elizabeth Rubel

One moment I was in 1850, and the next it is 2014. The year had changed but from what I could tell, I am still the same Benson J. Lossing.[1] Looking around me, I note that I remain on Breed’s

1850 etching

The Bunker Hill Battle Monument, by Elizabeth Rubel

One moment I was in 1850, and the next it is 2014. The year had changed but from what I could tell, I am still the same Benson J. Lossing.[1] Looking around me, I note that I remain on Breed’s

Column of Trajan 1820 etching

The Column of Trajan, from the vantage point of Bunker Hill, by Chloë Walker

With the intention of designing a monument fit to commemorate the events that occurred at Bunker Hill in the midst of the American Revolutionary War, I set out to survey several other monuments around the globe, in search of inspiration.

Column of Trajan 1820 etching

The Column of Trajan, from the vantage point of Bunker Hill, by Chloë Walker

With the intention of designing a monument fit to commemorate the events that occurred at Bunker Hill in the midst of the American Revolutionary War, I set out to survey several other monuments around the globe, in search of inspiration.

aerial to north 2

Jerusalem in history and memory, by Adam DiBattista

Just outside the walled city, to the south-west, is a series of rock cut tombs known as the Ketef Hinnom. The first internments of Ketef Hinnom occurred during the 7th century BCE and continued into the 2nd century BCE.[1] Two

aerial to north 2

Jerusalem in history and memory, by Adam DiBattista

Just outside the walled city, to the south-west, is a series of rock cut tombs known as the Ketef Hinnom. The first internments of Ketef Hinnom occurred during the 7th century BCE and continued into the 2nd century BCE.[1] Two

604 destruction

The End of the Philistines, by Samantha Chasse

This smashed assemblage of storage jars discovered at the Philistine city of Ashkelon dates to 604 B.C.E. These jars were probably used for wine storage. Charcoal, collapsed roofs, and charred remains were also found around these jars, and there is

604 destruction

The End of the Philistines, by Samantha Chasse

This smashed assemblage of storage jars discovered at the Philistine city of Ashkelon dates to 604 B.C.E. These jars were probably used for wine storage. Charcoal, collapsed roofs, and charred remains were also found around these jars, and there is